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Precious…







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Materials Used:

–Stardream Fuse Mica cardstock in Bronze
–Pearlized decorative paper from SEI Windsor Collection
–Papertrey Ink Kraft cardstock
–Unity Stamp Co. rubber stamp sets: “All Worth It” and “Love Life” (by Melody Ross)
–American Crafts Zing! Opaque embossing powder in Black Glitter
–VersaMark Watermark Stamp Pad
–Colorbox Fluid Chalk Cat’s Eye Ink Pad in Dark Brown
–Bazzill InStitch’z Floss in French Vanilla
–We R Memory Keepers paper piercer
–All Night Media Studio Art Pop Dots
–Imaginisce Glam Rocks Rhinestuds
–Imaginisce I-Rock
–Pink Paislee “Queen Bee” Flip Notes
–3M ATG714 adhesive gun

Hung…With Care







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Materials Used:

Cardstock: Papertrey Ink in Pine Feather, Bazzill Textured in Snow;
Mat Cardstock: SEI, from the “Glitzmas” Collection;
Decorative Paper: Memory Box, from the “Tinsel” Collection;
Stamps: Stampin’ Up! “Heard From The Heart” set;
Tools: Cricut Imagine, Cricut Imagine “Snow Angel” Art Cartridge;
Embellishments: Jenni Bowlin Pearl Flowers in Cream Cheese;
Ink: Stampin’ Up! Stampin’ Pad in Cherry Cobbler;

Love Notes

Today’s card project was first inspired by a color palette. One with a decidedly masculine feel to it. I wanted to play with texture and the concept of hard vs. soft. In the end, the card took a romantic turn. But, I’ll let you in on a little secret. Now, I know I have a few male readers–but for the most part, I have my Ladies. Here’s the scoop: Despite their rough and gruff exteriors, most men still like to get a love note now and again. I know, shocking. (And for those of you who know me a little too well–Yes, even a straight man enjoys a love note. Of course, not that I’m saying I’m in the habit of sending straight men love notes. But, I digress…)

Today’s project uses three different cardstocks: Stampin’ Up! cardstock in Early Espresso (5 1/2″ x 8 1/2″), and Stardream Fuse Mica cardstock in Copper (4″ x 5 1/2″) and Bronze (4″ x 5 1/2″).

With the copper mica piece, I wanted to create my “hard” layer. I took the cardstock and ran it through the Cuttlebug with a Tim Holtz Textured Impressions Fade folder called (oddly enough) “Bricks”. I particularly love the Tim Holtz folders because of the fade effects that do not give a completely solid impression across the cardstock. The negative spaces create some nice tension in your designs.

Since I knew the rest of my palette was decidedly darker in tone, I decided to use a bit of chalk in (Colorbox in Chestnut Roan) and some Kleenex to give my bricks a bit of a patina and create some shadowing in the nooks and crannies. Unfortunately, because the cardstock is so shiny, I’m not sure this effect carries across in the photos. But, in person, it makes for a rich contrast.

For the bronze mica layer, I turned to Tim Holtz and my Cuttlebug again. Using one of his On The Edge Alterations dies, Scrollwork, I created the scalloped border–which provides the “soft” portion of my card.

Using this dichotomy of hard and soft, I thought the bricks v. the scrollwork conveyed this feeling very well. (It also serves as a metaphor for the man receiving it (gruff exterior, cuddly interior). I layered the scrollwork on top of the bricks and adhered them with my 3M ATG 714 adhesive gun. I found a piece of SEI stitched ribbon (from the “Windsor” collection) that fit the feel of the card very nicely.

Using the same adhesive, I placed my layered piece on top of the cardstock base that forms the card–lining up all of the edges on the left side.

Finally, to convey the sentiment, I went rummaging through my goodies and found the perfect little metal flair badge from American Crafts “Hugs & Kisses” collection. I adhered the metal badge with a 1/2″ glue dot.

Before I close with a few more close-up shots, I’d like to encourage you to show and tell the person or persons you love–whether man or woman–just that. None of us can ever hear that we are loved too much. Until next time, keep crafting.




Let It Snow (?)

Yesterday, I was goofing around trying to decide on which project to tackle. Meanwhile, I realized that there was a chill in the air nipping at the back of my neck. I looked out the window (*distraction*) and realized it was one of those days. The ones where the sky is a frozen ice blue in color with little cloudiness. Where the wind seems to be missing, but blusters here and again. The kind where time seems to have just suspended itself and Mother Nature has let out a quiet, but definite, B-r-r-r-r.

When I got back to my workspace, I knew I wanted to make a card to capture that feeling. It’s funny because the piece of decorative paper I decided to use (from SEI) really isn’t winter or snowflake related per se, but yet it works. Some ribbon, a stamp, and my I-Rock and this icy blue card appeared. Can you feel it?





Trending: Lace Impressions

In my continuing quest to own every crafting product imaginable (a quest that at face value sounds like a joke–until you check out my stash), I’m always interested in the trends and patterns that seem to pop-up with each new season of line introductions from the various craft companies. One of the more notable trends of this Fall 2010 season is the popularity of lace.

Many paper lines, stamps, and embellishments seem to be featuring a strong throwback to something that was once considered apropos to vintage or shabby chic projects. However, lace (whether literal or in its impression) seems to be on trend for major use in scrapbook and cardmaking projects through the rest of the year. Now, I don’t think lace was ever out. But, seeing it reemerge so strongly as a main focal point in crafting is rather unusual. The influx of laser cutting with cardstock and ribbon has made it easier for intricate lace patterns to be transitioned into new uses and forms. One area that seems to have heavily embraced the lace trend is stamping. Today’s card project features a lace rubber stamp as a focal point.

This card project is made from Stampin’ Up! cardstock in Bravo Burgundy. The card mat is decorative foiled cardstock from SEI’s “Lovebirds” collections. The lace stamp I used was from Donna Salazar’s “Trunk In The Attic” series of cling mounted rubber stamps. This particular stamp is called “Lacey Goodness”. It measures approximately 4 3/4″ x 3 7/8″. To achieve the effect I wanted, I stamped the image using VersaMark on to a piece of the Bravo Burgundy cardstock. Then, I used Stampin’ Up!’s White Stampin’ Emboss powder and my heat tool to set the image. Once it was cooled, I cut around the stamped image and used it on my card front. The heat embossing, I think, gives the look of texture and realism to the intricate cut-out work of the lace pattern. I thought the quilled rose added just the right finishing accent to the mood of the card. The sentiment is a K & Co. Grand Adhesion and the inside journaling card is from Prima Marketing.